German Govt. Ignored Invaders’ Fake Passports

The German government ignored the fact that thousands of nonwhite invaders pretending to be refugees used fake passports to gain entry to the country, refused to prosecute them, and still gave them asylum despite not knowing who they were, a senior former member of Angela Merkel’s party has admitted.
Writing in a piece in The European magazine, Erika Steinbach, who has been a member of the German Bundestag since 1990, and has served the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) in many senior positions since 1974, said that Merkel’s policies had put Germany at great risk.
Steinbach has been a member of the national board of the CDU (CDU-Bundesvorstand) since 2000, and as recently as 2009, Merkel offered her the position of Secretary of State in the Federal Ministry of Education and Research—which she declined.
Steinbach’s resignation from the CDU last week caused a stir in Germany, and her article, titled “Why I left the CDU,” is bound to further raise tensions within the party.
She starts off by outlining her opposition to the German bank bailout of Greece, but then goes on to say that event was “overshadowed in 2015 by the Chancellor’s unilateral decision to allow more than a million migrants to travel to Germany, and to transport them here by bus and train, even though many came from safe countries of origin.”
“Practically all of them,” she continued, referring to the invaders, “had landed in other EU countries, and thus should have been rejected [by Germany] under current EU law (the Dublin Agreement).
“All this contradicts the established legal order, and this inconsistent approach isolated Germany in Europe.”
Dealing with the invasion overwhelmed the authorities, she continued. Even now, she wrote, “more than a year after the beginning of the gigantic influx of migrants, there are still tens of thousands of people living in school halls and other collective gatherings.”
Furthermore, she continued, the security risks are enormous: “To this day, we still do not know who exactly came into our country. The migrants all have smartphones, but, oh, by some miracle, they do not have passports and other ID documents.”
She pointed out that for the first six months of the invasion, the decision on whether to grant asylum had “unforgivably” been made on the basis of the applicant simply filling out a questionnaire—and nothing else.
In addition, she wrote, the Federal Office for Migration has not filed any criminal complaints about thousands of false passports, “but simply distributed the fraudulent migrants to the federal states.”
It is to be assumed, she added, that “no federal authority commits such a massive breach of law on its own initiative and on its own responsibility.”
Steinbach pointed out that the use of fraudulent documents in Germany is “usually punishable with up to five years’ imprisonment,” but there has to date not been a single prosecution in this regard.
“Confidence in our constitutional state is eroded when parking offense infringements are strictly enforced, but serious crimes [as forged passports] are deliberately ignored by our state, contrary to the law.”
She pointed out that terrorists had also come to Germany along with the invaders. “The security situation of our country and our way of life, are in danger, as the last two New Year’s Eve [events] have shown.
“And the crime statistics of 2015 show, if they are thoroughly and objectively analyzed, that the number of criminal foreigners has risen by 12.8 percent.
“The integration of the millions of people from many other cultures will take many years, if it can be done at all, given the religious, cultural, and economic gaps,” she wrote, adding that the invasion was costing Germany at least €20 billion every year.
Steinbach said this had convinced her that she could no longer remain a member of the party she had supported for 40 years, and that it was clear that Merkel’s CDU was “no longer my party.”