“Neo-Nazi Underground” Fantasy

Claims by the Deutsche Welle (DW) news service—now syndicated across the world—that “hundreds of neo-Nazis have gone underground” in Germany and are preparing “terrorist structures,” is a fantasy based on distortions of official figures and a deliberate misinterpretation of a single far-left researcher’s comments.
The original DW report, titled “Hundreds of neo-Nazis in Germany have gone underground,” published on January 9, 2017, started the nonsense with the completely unfounded claim that hundreds of people had gone “underground.”
In reality, the German interior ministry figures, upon which the article is based, said nothing of the sort.
The figures originated with a December 2016 response to a German parliamentary question asking how many “arrest warrants” for “right wingers” were still outstanding.
The answer given to that question was that there were just under 600 arrest warrants “outstanding,” and that of that number, 403 warrants were issued in the first 10 months of 2016 alone.
These warrants were issued against those who “have been deemed on account of relevant police information to belong to the category ‘crime motivated by the political right.'”
The DW article itself said that “not all of these right-wing extremists are being sought for politically motivated crimes, but in 92 cases the arrest warrant does indeed relate to a politically motivated offense.”
In other words, of these 600 outstanding warrants, only 92 relate to an actual offense, as defined by the democratic Stasi state—which can range from making a remark on Facebook to spray-painting a “politically incorrect” slogan on a wall.
There is, therefore, no justification to claim that even the 92 “politically motivated offenses” are “terrorists” or “potential terrorists.”
The DW article then went on to quote one Matthias Quent, a research assistant at the  Institute of Sociology at the University of Jena, who is a professional “researcher” in the “right-wing scene”—in other words, another far-leftist extremist using an academic posture to insert “anti-fascist” propaganda into compliant controlled media outlets.
Quent told the DW that anyone “going underground could lead to further radicalization, and to political aims being pursued more determinedly, with violence.”
While there is nothing factually incorrect with what Quent said, the reality is that there is no evidence whatsoever that any of the subjects of the “outstanding warrants” has “gone underground”—and there is also zero evidence of a “neo-Nazi terrorist army” being formed.
This sort of fantasy is regularly rolled out by the controlled media in its efforts to justify ever-greater restrictions on legitimate political parties and people who oppose the mass Third World invasion of Europe.