October Elections in Austria as Coalition Implodes

The collapse of the ruling conservative-socialist Austrian coalition government has meant that Austria will have a snap general election on October 15—possibly opening the door to power for the anti-invasion Freedom Party (FPÖ).
The ruling coalition, made up of Chancellor Christian Kern's Social Democratic Party of Austria (SPÖ) and the Austrian People's Party (ÖVP) was supposed to govern until its term ran out in 2018.
However, the growth of the FPÖ—and the collapse of the SPÖ and ÖVP votes in last year’s presidential elections, combined with internal fighting over leadership and policy toward the mass nonwhite fake refugee invasion, has finally caused the coalition to break apart.
The sudden resignation of ÖVP leader—and deputy chancellor—Reinhold Mitterlehner, from all his posts, brought the crisis to a head.
Mitterlehner complained that he was unable to continue because of infighting within his party, and therefore had no choice but to lay down his leadership and his deputy chancellorship.
The ÖVP moved quickly to replace him with the current foreign minister, the 30-year-old Sebastian Kurz, widely punted by the controlled media as a “dynamic” leader who could restore that party’s fortunes.
Rather than try and carry on with the increasingly impossible coalition, Kurz however immediately called time on the coalition and announced that he would be withdrawing his party’s support from the government.
The FPÖ is currently the single largest party with over 30 percent of the vote, but the presidential elections of last year saw its vote climb to 49 percent.
The chances are therefore extremely good that the FPÖ will emerge as the single largest party—and given recent developments, it may well consider a coalition government with the ÖVP.
The FPÖ lost no time in getting its election campaign off the ground, with party leader H. C. Strache releasing the first election video in which he mapped out the three platforms upon which the party will fight: “the mass invasion, huge unemployment, and record tax levels.”
In a statement on the party website, the FPÖ also revealed its first election poster, headlined “Austria can always count on him, while others appear to be wiser only shortly before elections.”
The poster’s punchline reads “FPÖ—otherwise nothing will ever change.”
The FPÖ will also produce material mapping out the numerous false promises made by the SPÖ and ÖVP, and will concentrate on mapping its own major policies which include “zero tolerance of Islamism,” the protection of women’s rights, fighting welfare abuse, protectionism for Austrian workers, and the immediate “deportation of asylum seekers and criminal immigrants.”
The FPÖ campaign will start in Vienna on May 18, by which time 500,000 copies of the initial material will have been printed.