ISIS Defeated in Iraq: Time for the “Refugees” to Go Home

The final defeat of the ISIS terrorists in the Iraqi city of Mosul has effectively ended the war in that country—which means that there is no longer an excuse for Iraqis to be seeking “asylum” in Europe, and any failure to return home means that they were never genuine “refugees” in the first place.
According to a statement issued by the Prime Minister of Iraq, Haider al-Abadi, the last of the ISIS terrorists holding out in Mosul have either been killed or driven out.
al-Abadi has already arrived in Mosul “to announce its liberation and congratulate the armed forces and Iraqi people on this victory.”
ISIS seized Mosul in June 2014, and it was from the steps of that city’s largest mosque that the Caliphate was declared, which then straddled both Iraq and Syria.
It was the sudden advances of ISIS fighters in 2014 which revealed that most of their weapons had come from arms shipments supplied by the American government, which had claimed to be supporting “moderate rebels” in their war against the Syrian government.
The Iraqi government announced the full "liberation" of eastern Mosul in January, but the west of the city, remained an ISIS stronghold until now. 
At least 900,000 Iraqis fled the city, about half the population. Many of them then claimed “asylum” in Europe—but only after crossing several safe countries—to do so.
In addition, most of Iraq itself remained under government control, and was still “safe” as well—which means that there was in fact no real reason to leave Iraq at all.
All of these factors show that there were in fact no genuine “refugees” from Iraq—and that all of them were merely taking the opportunity to invade Europe to parasite off the welfare systems of white countries.
Final proof of this will come with the reality that almost none of those who have claimed “asylum” in Europe will even consider returning to Iraq, despite the defeat of ISIS in that country.