California: 75% of Black Boys Can’t Read or Write Properly, Says Department of Education

Seventy-Five percent of all black males in California classrooms failed to meet reading and writing standards on the most recent round of testing, according to data from the state Department of Education.
More than half of black boys scored in the lowest category on the English portion of the test, trailing their female counterparts, and, according to the Los Angeles Daily News, the “disparity reflects a stubbornly persistent gender gap in reading and writing scores that stretches across ethnic groups.”
In addition, the data revealed that on average, boys in high school score better than those in grade school, but girls outperform them by consistent margins at every age—but, the paper says, “differences between boys and girls still pale in comparison to differences found by race, ethnicity and class.”
The Los Angeles Daily News carried out a deeper analysis of the data to try and find the “cause” of the gap, and was forced to admit that a “higher family income does not appear to even things out.”
Furthermore, the paper continued, the “gap is not unique to California” and that the “phenomenon is nevertheless worrisome because it may compound other educational disparities California has attempted to close for decades, without success.”
Furthermore, the paper added, “scores aren’t the only educational area in which black boys trail their peers. African-American boys are more likely to be suspended and drop out of school than other demographic groups, in California and elsewhere.
“But the reading data is sobering. As early as fourth grade, for example, nearly 80 percent of black boys failed to meet state reading standards. Of all ethnic groups for which the state collects data, black boys trailed black girls by the widest margin.”
According to the California Department of Education, there are a total of 6,226,737 public school students in that state—of which only 24 percent (or 1,500,932) are white.