UK: Pakistani Sex-Gang Attacks “Covered Up” for Fear of “Racism”

Mass sex attacks—involving potentially thousands of young white girls being abused by Pakistanis living in Britain—have been ignored and covered up out of a fear of being called “racist,” a number of leading leftist political figures have said.
According to a report in the Yorkshire Post, the far left Labour Party Member of Parliament for Rotherham Sarah Champion—who is also her party’s “equalities spokesperson,” said that people are avoiding “reporting child abuse over racism fears.”
Champion said there is a need to acknowledge that the “majority of perpetrators have been British-Pakistani” in the English towns and cities where grooming gangs have been found to have targeted girls.
The paper said that “Asian sex gangs have been uncovered and prosecuted across the country, including offenders in Rotherham, where 1,400 girls are said to have been abused between 1997 and 2013 while authorities turned a blind eye.”
Champion said people are “more afraid to be called a racist than they are afraid to be wrong about calling out child abuse.”
“We've got now hundreds of men, Pakistani men, who have been convicted of this crime—why ae we not commissioning research to see what's going on and how we need to change what's going on so it never happens again?" she asked.
“If it was people from a particular town that was doing this crime across the country, if it was people from—I don't know—a motorbike gang doing this, we'd recognise that as an indicator and we'd deal with it—but we're just not dealing with it.
“I know in Rotherham I've met frontline social workers who, when—we're talking 10 years ago - they were trying to report this crime, were sent on race relations courses, they were told they were going to have disciplinary action if they didn't remove the fact they were identifying the person as a Pakistani male.
"This is still going on in our towns now, I know it's still going on but we're still not addressing it."
Another report quoted the UK’s Solicitor General Robert Buckland as pointing out that the Pakistani gangs were deliberately targeting white girls because of [anti-white] racism.
“Asian grooming gangs who abuse white teenage girls should be given longer sentences where there is evidence of racism,” Buckland told The Daily Telegraph.
His comments follow the convictions of 17 men and one woman over the sexual abuse of under-age girls in Newcastle, northern England.
Those prosecuted were from the Bangladeshi, Pakistani, Indian, Iraqi, Iranian and Turkish communities, and were mainly born in Britain.
One of the 18-strong gang convicted said all white women are “trash” and only good for one thing—sex.
According to the Telegraph, some MPs “have questioned why the apparently racially-aggravated nature of their offences was not taken into account when they were sentenced.”
Buckland told the Telegraph: “The law does not discriminate. When it talks about sentencing increases for racial aggravation it doesn’t cut one way, it cuts all ways. Where there is a racial element in sexual abuse cases the law is clear that courts can apply a sentencing uplift.”
The trials in Newcastle followed a number of similar cases – including in Rotherham and Oxford—and Buckland echoed Champion’s concern that fears of being accused of racism may have deterred the authorities from adopting a tougher approach.
“There has been an institutional reticence when it comes to Asian gangs that groom and abuse white girls,” he said. “Some people have been more concerned about being labelled racist than dealing with child safeguarding.”
Even the former head of the Orwellian Equality and Human Rights Commission,” a black named Trevor Phillips, writing in a column in the Telegraph newspaper, said it was “time to admit most sex grooming gangs are Muslim amid calls for abusers to be treated as rate hate criminals and given tougher sentences.”
Phillips also condemned the establishment—including controlled media such as the BBC—for not “properly describing” and identifying the perpetrators.
He said the UK “must urgently wake up and admit the true nature of the grooming gangs to prevent other, vulnerable girls being targeted.”
Phillips said that describing these gangs as “Asian” wrongly points the finger at ethnic groups like Indian Hindus who have not been implicated.
In his column, he wrote: “What the perpetrators have in common is their proclaimed faith. They are Muslims, and many of them would claim to be practising. It is not Islamophobic to point this out, any more than it would be racist to point out that the most active persecutors of LGBT people come from countries where most people are, like me, black.”
A former policing minister, Mike Penning, has written to the government's top lawyer, Attorney General Jeremy Wright, saying that the Pakistani  gangs should be treated as “race hate criminals” so they can be handed tougher prison sentences.
Penning said that “our elites have replaced their old fear of being called racist with a new bogey. It comes to something when the BBC prefers to risk being condemned for racism than expose itself.”
Penning said it is shocking that the men behind the sickening abuse cannot be given tougher sentences that reflect that they single out and target white people. 
He said: “Some of them freely admitted that their attitude to these girls was based on race. If that's the case then this is a racially motivated crime and the sentence should and must reflect that.
“I cannot understand, in a case where the police have done brilliantly well, why the sentence doesn't reflect the severity of the crime.”